Home > Assessment, Curriculum, Education Policy, Teaching > Did they meet their targets?

Did they meet their targets?

Manifesto’s are due to be launched imminently, I thought about last time round and wondered how much of the conservatives manifesto actually came to fruition. I dug out the 2010 manifesto to take a look. The section on schools starts with some bold claims:

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They were going to “Improve standards for all”, “Close the attainment gap”, “Enhance the prestige and quality of the teaching profession”, “Give heads and teachers tough new powers of discipline,” “restore rigour to the curriculum and exam system,” and “give every parent access to a good school”.

Did they manage it?

“Improve standards for all”

This is a noble aim, and one I hope all politicians have at their core. I certainly think the tories were trying to improve standards. This is fairly unmeasurable though. They cut money for school buildings, which means some schools are housed in less than brilliant accommodation, but some schools were improved. Let’s hope we all, in the education sector, have been, and continue to, improving standards fore all.

“Close the attainment gap”

In 2010 the reported attainment gap was 27.5% in 2014 it was 26.6%, this is certainly a drop. A drop which one would assume owes at least some thanks to the Lib Dems pupil premium payment.
It is great that the gap has dropped, although it is still far too high. And the measure itself is crude, as it’s based on FSM which is self nominated and misses a large amount of the most deprived in our communities.

“Enhance the prestige and quality of the teaching profession”

This is a great aim, the highest performing school systems have prestigious status for teachers. It is unclear, however, why Michael Gove thought an all out war with the teaching unions in which he repeatedly demonised teachers was the best way to do this. The constant teacher bashing and dismissing opposing views to his own was certainly not a way to achieve an enhanced status for the profession, quite the opposite in fact.

Teach first (love it or hate it) has certainly brought in more top end graduates, and as one of the largest graduate recruiters it would seem that at least with final year students some prestige has increased. Although that’s certainly not something the government can take credit for as it’s a charity and existed before they came to power. Their manifesto included the idea to expand it to “Teach Now” and “Troops to teachers” neither of which I’ve heard much about since?

“Give heads and teachers tough new powers of discipline”

This one was mainly lip service I think, and hasn’t really impacted anything. Legally schools can now keep pupils for detention for up to two hours without prior notice, but I don’t know any schools that have moved away from a policy of informing parents. There was also the “reasonable force” measure, that was pretty much exactly the same as the law it replaced.

“Restore rigour to the curriculum and exam system”

This one remains to be seen. I’m certainly in favour of the new maths curriculum, all the way from KS1-5, it certainly has more rigour, although I’d personally have liked even more (ie calculus on the GCSE, you can read more of my views here). I’ve not really looked in depth at the other subjects, I don’t have enough knowledge to discuss them – I’d love to hear your views if you have any in the new curricula in your subject.

The exam reforms are another matter, we won’t know whether they are an improvement until they start, they have a lot of potential but it certainly seems to be a little rushed. The new maths GCSE is due to be examined in 2017, the course contains more content and as such it will take more than two years to cover, yet we have no sample assessment materials as yet to base a decision on which exam board to choose. That said I do think it will be an improvement, I just wish it had been thought out and introduced better and more quickly.

“Give every parent access to a good school”

Like the others, a very noble aim, and one which we should be applauded. However, the decision to allow Free Schools to be built where people fancied, rather than building schools where there were a shortage of places, has led to some areas still having a shortage of school places and some having a surplus. This means that some parents struggle to access any school, never mind a good one. The investment in new schools had been evident, but it’s been too often in the wrong place.

So, they have closed the gap, and they have increased rigour in the curriculum. They haven’t improved the prestige of the profession, they’ve failed to build schools in the correct places and they’ve not increased power to discipline. Some hits, some misses. They did, of course, have other education policies over their tenure (I discussed some here) but these are the ones mentioned in their 2010 manifesto.

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  1. December 31, 2015 at 12:06 pm

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