Home > Maths, Pedagogy, Teaching > Modelling in class

Modelling in class

Recently the idea of modelling is one that appears to be following me around everywhere. I mean that in the sense of modelling as a teaching strategy, not that Calvin Klein is stalking me and urging me to take to a cat walk for him.

The repeat appearance of discussion around modelling has got me thinking about it a lot. At the recent #mathconf19 many of the sessions discussed modelling. Ed Southall (@solvemymaths) did some great modelling on constructions and suggested many ways use it to improve outcomes, Kate Milnes (@katban70) talked through modelling a mathematical thought process and using it to help students achieve their own and Pete Mattock (@MrMattock) looked at visually modelling abstract ideas to make sense of it.

A recent CPD session I attended split the group into two and a different teacher taught each group how to construct an origami crane. One taught using modelling and instructions while the other went out of her way not to and then the different outcomes were discussed.

The trust I work in sees modelling in the classroom as best practice and it is encouraged in all lessons. This is similar to stories I hear from friends in other schools and trusts in the local area.

Then I read this piece by (@mrgmpls) which spoke about the “norm” in lessons being that students are given problems and expected to struggle their way through with minimal input because “without struggle there is no learning”. The blog post was arguing that this is not the best way to teach and pointed to many examples of recent posts about “desirable difficulties” and the such as evidence that this anti-modelling feeling was very prevalent in education today.

This got me thinking on a few levels, firstly it made me think about struggle in the classroom. I’m a firm believer in the idea of modelling. I think that modelling how to do sometime a good solid worked examples should be a staple of any teaching. But I also see the need to struggle in the classroom. If we model processes and have students then complete basically the same question following the model and never get them thinking about it again then we open them up to the possibility of becoming very unstuck in an exam if a topic is examined in a different way.

For me, this means that students need to learn the processes and the conceptual understanding of the topics together. I would also argue that completing exercises of similar questions to embed these is a very good idea. However, there needs to be some point when students need to learn to apply their processes and knowledge outside of their comfort zone. For instance, when teaching trigonometry I would teach non-right triangles and right triangles separately. I would teach sine and cone rules separately, but I would always incorporate some lesson time at the end to a series of problems where they have to deduce which process, or processes, they need to use to be able to answer the question. I might even model my thought process for them, but they will then need to think about why they are doing this and apply it.

I thought that this would be a common theme in all classrooms, so the second question I had from the article was “is there really a feeling of anti modelling at play?”. Having discussed it a bit with the author I discovered that he is based in the US, and I got to thinking that maybe it might be a US vs UK idea, or that perhaps it was even just an idea limited to the state he teaches in, so I tweeted out asking if any on edutwitter were in schools where modelling is discouraged.

I was surprised to discover that actually there are some UK based teachers who are discouraged from modelling in the classroom. This makes me wonder how widespread this is, and what the rationale is for discouraging modelling. If you are in a setting that discourages modelling, or are against modelling, I’d love to hear about it and the reasons behind it. Please get in touch via the comments or on social media.

  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Comments welcome......

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: